Test Shows Android Task Killers Are Still Useless

Carriers and manufacturers still often recommend the use of task killer apps on Android to speed up your phone and save battery life, but they can actually do more harm than good. PC World does a few real-world tests to show that they are, in fact, useless when it comes to saving battery.

We've talked about why you shouldn't use task killers before: Android memory doesn't work like PC memory, so clearing it out won't help your speed or battery life, and it could even kill processes you want to keep open. PC World actually did some real-world experimentation to back this up, trying out Advanced Task Killer on five different Android phones. They found that at best, it gave a 4.2 per cent increase in battery life, and at worst a 0.5 per cent decrease. If you wanted a bit more experimental evidence against the use of task killers, hit the link to check out their article. And, while you're at it, check out our features on how to actually increase battery life on your phone, speed up a sluggish Android device with a few other tricks or update your old phone with a custom ROM (since Android 1.6 doesn't manage tasks well enough on its own).

Task-Killer Apps: Will They Help or Hurt Your Battery Life? [PC World]


Comments

    Common Knowledge i thought :|

    Nobody is recommending task killers anymore. Dead and buried.

    "They found that at best, it gave a 4.2 per cent increase in battery life, and at worst a 0.5 per cent decrease."

    Sounds to me like it does work then. Or perhaps a better summary is more appropriate?

    Problem with all these bloody tests is I want to know ho much extra battery I get when NOT using the phone, as this is where it counts.
    All but the most braindead numbskull would understand that using a phone drains battery the most, but given most time is spent in a 'sleep' state - this is what we really want to extend...

    4.2 percent can still make a difference, that's like an extra hour per day.
    I tend to use one just to close things I know I'm not going to use again for a day or so (maps for instance), but for stuff I regularly use like Facebook or messaging I just leave them in memory.

    ok this question is probably redundant, but does turning off the gps function do anything either?

      Oh, I'm talking about a tablet by the way

    Easy, get an SGS2 which under fairly normal use could get me two days use. I still charge it every day so I know I've got spare fuel in the tank if I ever do have to stretch it.

    “They found that at best, it gave a 4.2 per cent increase in battery life, and at worst a 0.5 per cent decrease.”

    ummm with those figures I would take the risk of using it. worse off 0.5% for chance to be in front 4.2%, pretty easy decision? i'll have to read the article now dammit.

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