Reassessing mobile broadband options for the Eee PC

EeeEnhanced.jpg One consequence of Vodafone's recent launch of a USB 3G broadband stick modem that I didn't immediately realise was that it means that its older cabled USB modem is being taken off the market. Indeed, Vodafone's own site says that the device was no longer available as of August 11, but you might still be able to track down an older model if you visit a Vodafone store. Why does this matter? For Windows or Mac users, not having the cable is a definite advantage. However, if you want to add mobile broadband to the Eee PC, the older E220 model is a better choice, because you can make it work out of the box, as I've detailed before on Lifehacker. Getting the E169 to work is trickier, because its dual-mode function confuses the standard Xandros install. Blogger Liam Green-Hughes has detailed one approach to solving this problem, but it's a tad fiddly. Of course, Vodafone isn't the only choice in town — Optus and 3 both offer 3G packages using the U220, although they're also increasingly promoting the stick-only option. Each has price complications you need to be aware of too: Optus' new prepaid option has a hefty 10MB minimum download, and 3 users need to be careful about roaming charges, though that may change in the near future. What's your preferred approach to keeping your Eee PC connected? Let's hear about it in the comments. [Thanks Alex and Kaydo!]


Comments

    I recently bought an Eee 1000H and I'm using Bluetooth PAN in conjunction with my phone.

    This has two advantages, firstly there is nothing to plug into the Eee at all, it's totally wireless and the phone can stay in my pocket.

    The second and bigger advantage is that I don't have to pay for two separate SIMs/data plans in order to have Internet on both my phone and my laptop. One plan, one low payment (I'm on 3) and one shared data allowance.

    I guess it was a "tad fiddly"! I've had a go at making it easier by packaging up the files needed and getting everything to install automatically. Have a look at: http://www.greenhughes.com/content/huawei-e169g-easy-way and hopefully that should make it much easier to use the E169G on the EEE.

    Oh gods. Look, I have spent hours and hours on the internet (not on my eeePC, obviously) looking for how to make my new 3 mobile broadband stick (HUAWEI E160) (2GB plan) work with my EeePC 701SD (bought earlier this year), with a Linux system - although buggered if I can figure out which version. Could someone please recommend - with solid reasoning - either exactly how to make the bloody thing work, or if I should get one of these WiFi routers, or if I should just give in and buy Windows - which I don't want to do. I am a techno-gumby, so please explain in very small words, preferable of only one syllable.

      Sorry, should have said, after being assured by 3 that it would all work BEFORE I bought it, I have now rung 3 support only to be told after much 'please hold'ing that basically its my problem, they won't let me cancel the plan, and I should find a computer technician to sort it all out. Great.

        Hi Leelu, I was lent an E160G by 3 not so long ago to see how compatible it is with Linux. I wrote about it here: http://www.greenhughes.com/content/e160g-works-ubuntu-and-easy-peasy. What I would recommendthat you do is to replace the Xandros Linux operating system supplied on the EEE with "Easy Peasy", which is based on Ubuntu and available at: http://www.geteasypeasy.com/. This is much less scary than it sounds! Once you do this you will be able to plug the E160G in and you will be asked what provider you are with then it will work! You will also be able to do much more with your machine this way too as Easy Peasy and Ubuntu are much better than the Xandros supplied.

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